Why is hyperlapse footage in the news, and why stabilise it? Microsoft & Instagram

Hyperlapse_blog_28th_Aug_2014

Source: Kopf et al (2014) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sA4Za3Hv6ng

Very recently Microsoft announced an exciting development: that they had developed a new way of stabilising hyperlapse camera footage (that is, time-lapse footage where the camera moves as a tracking shot). With hyperlapse techniques you can achieve very cool and unique results such as here and here. Traditionally this is achieved with a series of photographs manually compiled together. Their development meant you could do so from video footage, so you could continuously record and it would distil your footage to a smooth, hyperlapse adventure. This is cool because it vastly simplifies the process and further empowers people to make awesome videos. Examples of its use are in really any situation, and there are great examples applied to nature and cities alike, first person POV or wide-angle cityscapes. Important to note that Microsoft had not announced how or when this research would come to market.

So on top of this hyperlapse hype, Instagram announced very recently that they had developed and released (on iOS) the functionality to allow users themselves to undertake similar capture. More on it here. Essentially, Instagram are about bringing this hyperlapse tech to your smartphone. A brief comparative look at the techniques seems to indicate that the Microsoft method relies upon reconstructing the scene in 3D (Microsoft’s technical explanation video shows a point-cloud generated via SfM photogrammetry, which is exciting on its own in how it deals with the unusual datasets) and developing a new, stabilised camera path through the old one. Instagram’s approach on the other hand uses the internal gyroscopic sensors to stabilise the footage via it’s ‘Cinema’ tech developed by lead project engineer Alex Karpenko. What stands out here is that Microsoft’s technique appears to work with a range of footage (thinking GoPro, smart-phone, DSLR, etc) regardless of additional sensor information, whereas Instagram’s Hyperlapse appears to rely on smartphones’ sensors to stabilise the footage (it is on iOS and will be on Android when API support becomes available).

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